SRO adds ‘Little Women’ performances

Feeling bad that you missed SRO Productions’ run of the musical version of Little Women? Well, cheer up. SRO will be presenting two encore performances at 8 p.m. Saturday, Nov. 10, and at 2 p.m. Sunday, Nov. 11, at the Roberson Museum and Science Center, 30 Front St., Binghamton.

For tickets, call the Roberson box office at 772-0660, ext. 223, or reserve online at www.Roberson.org.

Gretchen Hull: Young in years, mature in performance

Reviewed by Lee Shepherd

It’s said that youth is wasted on the young. Not in the case of pianist Gretchen Hull, who is both very young and musically mature.
Hull, who taped a segment of Expressions Oct. 25 before a select audience in the state-of-the-art WSKG studio in Vestal, played piano with a technical virtuosity and expressiveness that belies her age. She’s a recent college grad, so she’s probably at least in her late teens or early 20s, but she looks about 16. Read the rest of this entry »

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Twenty fingers and 88 keys add up to a fine evening of duets

Reviewed by Lee Shepherd

What could be more entertaining than an evening of parlor music played in one of the most gorgeous parlors in the Southern Tier – the Kilmer Mansion attached to Temple Concord – by two of the best pianists in Central and Southern New York.
Pej Reitz, a faculty member at Binghamton University, and Ida Tili Trebicka, who teaches at Syracuse University, swayed in unison on the piano bench, as they performed a sonata by Mozart, waltzes by Brahms, Norwegian dances by Grieg, Spanish dances by Moritz Moszkowski and a chaser of Gershwin songs from Porgy and Bess. Read the rest of this entry »

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‘Mauritius’ depicts sticky world of stamp collecting

Reviewed by Lee Shepherd

Stamp collecting — it ain’t just the beloved pastime of geezers and geeks. If you don’t believe philately isn’t simply an innocent hobby, but something far more sinister, you must see Mauritius, presented by the Binghamton University Theatre Department. Read the rest of this entry »

‘La Bohème’ still offers lyric lessons of love and loss

Reviewed by Tony Villecco

I attended Wednesday’s final dress rehearsal (Oct. 24) of Giacomo Puccini’s operatic masterpiece La Bohème, and while there were a few kinks yet to iron out, it was beautiful and musically fulfilling. Tri-Cities Opera will present two performances this weekend with an overall strong cast. No dress rehearsal is without its challenges; at times, the orchestra overshadowed the principals, especially in ensemble. The excellent chorus was ahead of the maestro during the festive second act, and lighting cues were continuing to be adjusted. Still, all this should be worked out, and even if it isn’t, the production merits enough positives to please even the most hardcore opera lover. Read the rest of this entry »

TCO production dedicated to singers who died this past summer

By Barb Van Atta

This weekend’s Tri-Cities Opera performances of Puccini’s La Bohème will be dedicated to three former members of the company who passed away in recent months: tenors Alan Crabb and Pasquale “Pat” Arcodia and soprano Rosalie (De Felice) Julian. Read the rest of this entry »

Were the arts part of your weekend?

The  “season” is in full swing, with exhibits, readings and performances galore. BAMirror’s volunteer reviewers are hard-working but few in number, and, that, dear readers, is where you come in. Your comments about local events that you have attended or participated in are needed to help BAMirror continue its goal to be an online “salon” for discussion of the arts in Broome County.

Whether you heard a concert or sang in it, watched a play or acted in it, toured an exhibit or submitted a painting to it, your thoughts — positive or negative — will help us keep the conversation going. Please join in!

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HOTA winners Deemie, Sall take arts to the streets

By Barb Van Atta

Winners of the ninth annual Broome County Arts Council’s Heart of the Arts (HOTA) and Lifetime Achievement Awards were announced Wednesday (Oct. 17). Here’s a closer look at Julie Deemie and Ron Sall, the recipients of HOTA awards honoring recent significant contributions to the arts in Broome County: Read the rest of this entry »

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Four named as Heart of the Arts winners

By Barb Van Atta

To be at the heart of the arts does not necessarily mean you are a creator of art. You also can be a person who brings artistic creations to your community. Winners of the ninth annual Broome County Arts Council’s Heart of the Arts and Lifetime Achievement Awards spend at least part of their time behind the scenes, helping make those essential connections between artists and their audiences. Read the rest of this entry »

Were you are-full this week?

Did you watch a show, hear a concert, visit a gallery? Please share your reflections.

Levine will conduct again at Met

Following up on last year’s announcement:

“James Levine is making a comeback.”

“Defying opera world doubters who thought he was too ill, weak or disengaged, the longtime and much loved music director of the Metropolitan Opera plans to return to the podium for the first time in two years, for a May 19 performance by the Met Orchestra at Carnegie Hall and for three productions at the opera house next season.”

Read more about this at Arts Beat, The New York Times Arts section.

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At CRT, murky play attacks big issues

Reviewed by George Basler

Steven Dietz has said “conspiracies are catnip to a playwright” because of the level of obsessiveness and outlandishness for the personalities involved, and because there’s always enough “truth” to ground their actions.

Obsessiveness and outlandishness are certainly on display at the Chenango River Theatre in Greene, which is ending its season with a production of Dietz’s Yankee Tavern, a play about the conspiracy theories and paranoia surrounding the attacks of 9/11. Read the rest of this entry »

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Endicott native Paglia ponders the future of fine arts; what’s your view?

In a recent Wall Street Journal article, American author, teacher and social critic Camille Paglia wrote  that “too many artists have lost touch with the general audience and have retreated to an airless echo chamber…

“For the arts to revive in the U.S., young artists must be rescued from their sanitized middle-class backgrounds. We need a revalorization of the trades that would allow students to enter those fields without social prejudice (which often emanates from parents eager for the false cachet of an Ivy League sticker on the car). Among my students at art schools, for example, have been virtuoso woodworkers who were already earning income as craft furniture-makers. Artists should learn to see themselves as entrepreneurs.”

Paglia, a self-described dissident feminist, was born in Endicott and was valedictorian of her 1968 Harpur College (Binghamton University) class. She is a professor at The University of the Arts in Philadelphia.

Here is a link to the article, which we at BAMirror hope will inspire some comments from you: http://tinyurl.com/94c7az9.

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Ti-Ahwaga actors tap into depth of ‘Death of a Salesman’ characters

Reviewd by George Basler

With Death of a Salesman, Arthur Miller created one of the great dramas of the 20th century and one of the towering figures of American literature: Willy Loman, the doomed salesman of the title. So, I was more than a little worried while driving up Route 17 to Owego to watch the Ti-Ahwaga Community Players launch their season with a production of Miller’s classic play. The non-profit troupe can claim the title as the oldest, continually active community theater in upstate New York, but tackling Miller’s masterpiece is a daunting task for any non-professional, community theater. I dreaded the possibility of a very long evening.

The good news is that I didn’t need to worry. The Ti-Ahwaga actors, under the direction of James Osborne, turn in a solid and effective production that captures the emotion of  Miller’s great play about self-delusion, Oedipal confrontations between fathers and sons and what constitutes success, or failure, in American life. The production will run through Oct. 21. Read the rest of this entry »

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BPO classical season has stunning start

Reviewed by Lee Shepherd

Noah Bendix-Balgley has it all – tall and imposing, well-spoken, personable, a fine composer as well as superb violinist, and if Saturday’s performance (Oct. 6) with the Binghamton Philharmonic is any indication, on his way to a world-class career.
The full-house audience in Binghamton University’s Osterhout Concert Theatre had it all, too – a performance of the Beethoven Violin Concerto in D Major played with incredible technical prowess and musicality, with back-up by a philharmonic that performs on par with orchestras that are the shining light of major cities across the U.S. and in world capitals. Read the rest of this entry »

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